WHAT MEDIA OUTLETS ARE SAYING ABOUT PVC

Iron in drinking water may pose more health risks than federal water regulators currently acknowledge.

Marc Edwards, an environmental engineering professor at Virginia Tech, says that iron may have played a critical role in the Flint lead-contamination crisis, according to WWL-TV. 

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Edwards helped uncover the severity of the lead crisis in Flint. He explained to WWL-TV how iron can have a negative impact on the water system. 

“[Iron] increases the leaching of lead into the water,” Edwards said. 

“While the iron itself won't likely make people sick, Edwards says high iron in the water can remove disinfectants like chlorine, allowing harmful bacteria to grow. Bacteria like legionella, which causes Legionnaire’s Disease. That's what Edwards said he believes may have happened in Flint,” the report said. 


Closed Bidding Increases Costs, Says OH Home Builders Assn

Vince Squillace, Executive Vice President of the Ohio Home Builders Association, to the Ohio House Energy and Natural Resources Committee: “[R]estricting what products can be utilized notably increases the cost of projects, and further, prevents communities from determining what material makes the most sense. Replacing arbitrary restrictions with the ability to propose use of alternative materials meeting specified standards opens up competition, and thus a more efficient use of funds.” EndFragment 

WILL FLINT OFFICIALS ADOPT A COMPETITIVE BIDDING PROCESS TO FIX THEIR PIPES?

Hon. Jon Russell, "Is the local, state and federal government going to just replace the iron pipes with new iron pipes? Or are they going to open up the bidding process to fair and competitive bidding to include a variety of piping materials, which will allow the best quality and best-priced piping material to replace the old?”